Executive Coaching Jobs:
The Easy Way To Find Them

Read how to find life and executive coaching jobs through a corporate coaching provider which employs or recommends coaches. How to make sure you are getting a good deal and avoid the traps.

How Executive Coaching Service Providers Operate

For executive life coaches who have a challenge marketing themselves, one solution is to take advantage of someone else's marketing expertise and  get on the books of an executive coaching service that promotes and/or provides executive business and life coaches to large companies.  

The clients of these companies are those medium to large businesses who choose to outsource their coaching needs rather than use internal coaches. 

And, on a smaller scale, some entrepreneurial life and business coaches leverage their coaching by creating a website that promotes other coaches under their brand - either for free or a fee.

But there are great executive coaching services and some - not so good - so be sure to check out  other life coaching jobs and opportunities for life coaches.

3 ways coaching services can find you executive coaching jobs

1. They employ you as an executive coach

A company offering executive coaching to business will sometimes actually employ a team of appropriately qualified coaches either on contract or salary.

These companies will usually require their coaches to have credible coaching credentials, and indemnity insurance. They may also want you to work exclusively with them.   With the right well-established company, the chances of a good flow of executive coaching jobs is usually pretty good.

One challenge  you  may face when applying to be listed for coaching jobs with a coaching service, is how to present your resume in an appropriate and attractive manner.  Resume.com is a company specialising in helping with this presentation so you come across in the right way.  It could be worth investing in some advice on making your resume hit the spot that makes the service see listing  you could be good for them

ResumeWriters.com

2. They promote you and collect the fee

The organization promotes life or business coaching and its stable of associated coaches on its website.  Some of these may have their niche as executive life coaches. The prospective client visiting the website chooses a preferred coach from that list of associates.

You as the coach are then given the details to follow up with the prospect to check if you are a good match and close the deal.

The organization invoices and collects the fees and pays a percentage to you, for your services. These can vary from 50/50 to 80/20 in the coaches favour.

3. They promote you as an executive coach, but you collect the fee:

When you join this type of coaching organization, you are able to put your coaching profile on their website, which promotes coaching in a general way and lists the member coaches.

Your profile will link directly to your contact details where the prospect can choose to contact you further about the executive coaching jobs they may have available. 

There may or may not be a fee to join as a member and/or you may be asked to pay a commission on any clients you get.

I say "asked" because I have been on such a list where it was really an honor system as to whether I let them know I had signed up a client through them and paid the commission (which I did of course!).

You might  find this book Becoming an Exceptional Executive Coach useful in helping you decide if this could be your niche. It has some really great hints on the distinctions of executive coaching as against life coaching that you need to be aware of such as the different assessment and reporting processes and how to adapt your style of coaching to this niche.

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7 Questions To Ask Before You Sign On

1.  Do You Have to follow their format?  If you coach under the banner of an executive coaching service you may be required to use THEIR executive life coaching format rather than your own.

However, it is usually possible to do your own stuff as an executive life coach within these formats and, if you are getting good results, chances are you won’t be questioned.

2. Beware promises, promises! Being listed on a coaching providers website as an associate can be a great way to get yourself known and out there.

However, the actual value is only as good as the promotion the organization does on your behalf and the number of prospective clients they attract to their website offering executive coaching jobs.

3.  How easy is the coaching company to find?  Do a search on the web for the type of coaching being offered (life, business, executive). 

Does the site come up on the first couple of pages and/or are they advertising. 

Don’t just search for the organization by name as, of course, it will come up on page 1!

4. What is their ongoing web marketing plan for attracting prospects?

5.  How are the prospects qualified as good leads?  Some sites have an invitation to "click for a free introductory session" and the organization will pass this onto you unchecked.  

I've found a lot of people who are not really all that interested or want to see what they can get for free will take advantage of this.  So make sure that the invitation also includes some way of qualifying people as acceptably serious prospects.

6. Does their website attract your preferred client demographic?
Speak to some of the coaches listed on the site to see how many leads or actual executive coaching jobs they are getting and the type of clients.

7.  How much work will I get from this executive coaching service?
Where the organization is taking you on as an associate and will be paying you an hourly or daily rate to coach their clients, ask "How much work can I expect to get a week/month".

See if you can talk to one of the coaches they employ to find out how good the flow of work is.  Of course you may start small and get more as the organization becomes more confident of your coaching ability.